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Mud Scarves

All-natural processes extract natural color from various types of tree bark, which is then mixed with mud found at the bottom of a local pond. Minerals from the mud maintain the color after washing and leave a silky-soft touch. The art of weaving and all natural dyeing requires a willingness to get muddy and colorful.

 

 
Pa Wu leads an environmentally sound weaving group located in eastern Thailand. With over forty years of weaving and dying experience, Pa Wu explained that her mom used to weave to use at home and sell in the local market.  When more visitors came, trading became a source of income for the family, which expanded through nearby villages and communities. Pa Wu started the weaving group with 13 women and 20 years later her group has grown to 50 women. Today Pa Wu celebrates the enjoyment and pride locals take in creating new designs and colors. The process is an adventure from beginning to end that creates jobs for many in the community.
 
 

 

It all begins with incorporating mud found at the bottom of a 300-year old pond and color from trees in their local forests. The art of weaving and all natural dyeing requires a willingness to get muddy and colorful and was passed down to the members of the group by their ancestors.
 
The all-natural processes extracts natural color from various types of tree bark and foliage, which is then mixed with mud found at the bottom of a local pond. Minerals from the mud maintain the color after washing and leave a silky-soft touch. The art of weaving and all natural dyeing requires a willingness to get muddy and colorful. Make an eco statement with these beautiful cotton scarves! 
 
The Mud Dying Process
Step 1: Soak the natural source of color; tree bark or foliage in the water for one day.

Step 2:
Bring the dye solution to a boil for 30 minutes. Step 3: Separate the tree bark from the solution; adding mud to the dye. Step 4: Place cotton in the solution. The darkness of the color depends on how many times the natural source has been soaked. It also depends on how long the cotton soaks in the solution. Step 5: Rise and hang the cotton to dry.
 
The Legend
A common legend told by elders says that fish always escaped the fisherman who used a white net. Once the fisherman soaked his white net in the mud, turning it gray he began to catch fish, and lots of them! From that time on, the village began using the mud in the dyeing process.

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